Toyota and Snam join forces to develop hydrogen mobility

 In Fuels, NEWS & INTERVIEWS, Sustainable Mobility, Technical innovation

The memorandum of understanding between the two companies focuses on the entire hydrogen value chain, starting with distribution and refuelling infrastructures. The long-term goal is to develop zero-emission solutions for heavy- and light-duty transport

Toyota and Snam have teamed up to accelerate sustainable hydrogen mobility even further. The memorandum of understanding between the two companies focuses on the entire hydrogen value chain, starting with distribution and refuelling infrastructures. The agreement envisages a series of projects to be carried out in Italy and Europe for heavy- and light-duty transport alike, in support of public administrations, local communities, businesses and private entities.

Toyota aims to create “sustainable mobility that in the long term involves the increasingly widespread use of zero-emission vehicles and mobility solutions, which is why the company has been investing “in hydrogen propulsion systems for over 25 years,” said the CEO of Toyota Motor Italy, Luigi Ksawery Lucà, who added: “We firmly believe that hydrogen can play a crucial role in the decarbonisation process of our society.”

Snam has also been committed for some time to greater use of hydrogen in mobility and the related industrial production cycle. In the transport sector, the company recently signed agreements with MSC and Fincantieri to build a hydrogen cruise ship, as well as with the Italian State Railways and Nord Milano Railways for railway mobility. Synergies with car manufacturers and public transport, according to Snam’s mobility sector manager, Alessio Torelli, will be “decisive for accelerating the development of the hydrogen supply chain”.

The collaboration agreement also involves CaetanoBus, which has built buses since 1946. For more than a decade by now, the company has focused on electric mobility and since 2018 has dedicated itself to the development of hydrogen-powered solutions.

The transport sector is the second largest source of carbon dioxide emissions, after electricity generation and heating (about 25% of global emissions). Decarbonisation is faced by many challenges, especially the capillarity of the sector and above all as regards infrastructures. Hydrogen from renewable sources is promising in terms of applications in sustainable mobility, be it fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) such as cars, trucks and trains, or as raw material for synthetic fuels for ships and aircraft. Advantages deriving from the development of hydrogen vehicles include: faster refuelling times, longer range with a “full tank” and lower ecological impact than electric vehicles with lithium batteries. The downside is represented by higher fixed costs and the lack of enabling infrastructures.